CDC and ACP: Stop Prescribing Antibiotics for Common Respiratory Infections

The Affordable Health Care Act has created patient satisfaction surveys which can affect a physician’s reimbursement for services rendered plus their actual employment by large insurers and health care systems. This has created a fear of not giving patients something or something they want at visits for colds, sore throats and other viral illnesses. Aaron M Harris, MD, MPH, an internist and epidemiologist with the CDC noted that antibiotics are prescribed at 100 million ambulatory visits annually and 41% of these prescriptions are for respiratory conditions. The unnecessary use of antibiotics has resulted in an increasing number of bacteria developing resistance to common antibiotics and to a surge in Emergency Department visits for adverse effects of these medications plus the development of antibiotic related colitis. To address the issue of overuse of antibiotics, Dr Harris and associates conducted a literature review of evidence based data on the use of antibiotics and its effects and presented guidelines for antibiotic use endorsed by the American College of Physicians and the Center for Disease Control.

  1. Physicians should not prescribe antibiotics for patients with uncomplicated bronchitis unless they suspect pneumonia are present”. Acute bronchitis is among the e most common adult outpatient diagnoses, with about 100 million ambulatory care visits in the US per year, more than 70% of which result in a prescription for antibiotics.” The authors suggested using cough suppressants, expectorants, first generation antihistamines, and decongestants for symptom relief.
  2. Patients who have a sore throat (pharyngitis) should only receive an antibiotic if they have confirmed group A streptococcal pharyngitis. Harris group estimates that antibiotics for adult sore throats are needed less than 2% of the time but are prescribed at most outpatient visits for pharyngitis. Physicians say it is quicker and easier to write a prescription than it is to explain to the patient why they do not need an antibiotic.
  3. Sinusitis and the common cold result in overprescribing and unnecessary use of antibiotics often. Over four million adults are diagnosed with sinusitis annually and more than 80% of their ambulatory visits result in the prescribing of an antibiotic unnecessarily. “ Treatment with antibiotics should be reserved for patients with acute rhinosinusitis who have persistent symptoms for more than ten days, nasal discharge or facial pain that lasts more than 3 consecutive days and signs of high fever with onset of severe symptoms. They also suggest patients who had a simple sinusitis or cold that lasted five days and suddenly gets worse (double sickening) qualified for an antibiotic

Last year two patients in the practice who were treated with antibiotics prescribed elsewhere for situations outside the current guidelines developed severe antibiotic related colitis. They presented with fever, severe abdominal pain and persistent watery bloody diarrhea. Usual treatment with oral vancomycin and cholestyramine did not cure the illness. One patient lost thirty pounds, the other sixty pounds. Fecal transplants were required to quell the disease. At the same time community based urine infections now require a change in antibiotic selection because so many of the organisms are now resistant to the less toxic, less expensive , less complicated antibiotics that traditionally worked.

“My doctor always gives me an antibiotic and I know my body and what it needs,” can no longer be the criteria for antibiotic use.

Cold and Flu Season Coming

As we head into fall and winter we see an increase in the number of viral respiratory illnesses in the community. Most of these are simple self-limited infections that healthy individuals can weather after a period of a few days to a week of being uncomfortable from runny noses, sinus congestion, sore throats, coughs, aches and pains and sometimes fever. There are studies out of Scandinavia conducted in extreme cold temperature environments that show that taking an extra gram of Vitamin C per day reduces the number of these infections and the severity and duration in elite athletes and Special Forces military troops. Starting extra vitamin C once you develop symptoms does little to shorten the duration or lessen the intensity of the illness. Vigorous hand washing and avoidance of sick individuals helps as well. Flu shots prevent viral influenza and should be taken by all adults unless they have a specific contraindication to influenza. A cold is not the flu or influenza. Whooping cough or pertussis vaccination with TDap should be taken by all middle aged and senior adults as well to update their pertussis immunity. We often see pictures of individuals wearing cloth surgical masks in crowded areas to prevent being exposed to a viral illness. Those cloth surgical masks keep the wearers secretions and “germs” contained from others but do nothing to prevent infectious agents others are emitting from getting through the pores of the mask and infecting them. If you wish to wear a mask that is effective in keeping infectious agents out then you need to be using an N95 respirator mask.

Once you exhibit viral upper respiratory tract symptoms care is supportive. If you are a running a fever of 101 degrees or higher taking Tylenol or a NSAID will bring the fever down. Staying hydrated with warm fluids, soups and broths helps. Resting when tired helps. Most adults do not “catch” strep throat unless they are exposed to young children usually ages 2-7 that have strep throat. Sore throats feel better with warm fluids, throat lozenges and rest.

You need to see your doctor if you have a chronic illness such as asthma , COPD, heart failure or an immunosuppressive disease which impairs your immune system and you develop a viral illness with a fever of 100.8 or higher. If your fever is 101 or greater for more than 24 hours it is the time to contact your doctor. Breathing difficulty is a red flag for the need to contact your physician immediately.

Most of these viral illnesses will make you feel miserable but will resolve on their own with rest, common sense and plenty of fluids.

Adult Sore Throats 2015 – 2016 Flu Season

Robert Centor, M.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, performed the definitive study on adult sore throats showing that 10% or less of adult sore throats are caused by bacteria particularly Group A Streptococcus . He went on to prove that bacterial Strep throats were accompanied by a cough, large swollen and tender lymph nodes, a temperature greater than 100.4 and an exudate on your tonsils. The disease is primarily seen in children age 2-7 and those who care for them and play with them. In adults who did not meet the criteria of having a cough, swollen and enlarged lymph nodes, a temperature of 100.4 and a tonsillar exudate, a rapid streptococcus throat swab was accurate 100 % of the time. If the quick strep analysis is negative you do not have a strep throat and do not require an antibiotic. We had two patients this past fall who did not meet the criteria of Dr. Centor, did not have the physical findings consistent with a strep throat, had a negative quick strep throat swab but upon performing a traditional throat culture were found to be positive for Group a Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus requiring antibiotics. Why did the discrepancy occur? According to the manufacturer they had to recall a batch of diagnostic material that was ineffective. Both patients were placed on antibiotics soon after their clinical course did not follow the path of a viral infection and both did well.

Most adult sore throats and colds do not require antibiotics. We reserve them for patient with debilitating chronic illnesses especially advanced pulmonary, cardiac and neurologic disease patients. With influenza season on the horizon we will continue to assess patient’s clinically using history, exam, quick strep throat swabs and traditional microbiological throat cultures where appropriate. I will continue to prescribe antibiotics where necessary but must admit, last years’ experience opened my eyes to a more liberal approach with the prescribing of antibiotics for simple sore throats.

Influenza Vaccine 2015- 2016 Season

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that all adult s receive the flu shot vaccination this coming fall. Our supply of flu vaccine is expected to arrive by September 1, 2015 and we will begin administering the vaccine shortly thereafter. This season there will be three types of intramuscular injectable flu vaccines available. All will contain a non-live attenuated version of the flu viruses. The Senior High Dose vaccine is recommended for all adults 65 years of age or older. The Trivalent or Quadrivalent vaccine is suggested for younger adults. The vaccine will contain 3 antigens including: an A/California/7/2009 H1N1 pdm09- like virus, an A/Switzerland/9715293/2013 H3N2 like virus and a B/Phuket/3073/2013 like virus. It is called a trivalent vaccine because it contains three virus types. The Quadrivalent Vaccine will contain a fourth antigen B/Brisbane/60/2008 like virus.

Please call the office to set up an appointment for your vaccination. Once you have received the vaccine it takes about ten to fourteen days for your body to develop antibodies against the flu. Influenza begins to appear in the northern United States in late October. The season can run through February into March. In South Florida we see little flu prior to Thanksgiving with the disease peaking in late January early February. Immunity in younger healthier patients will last throughout the flu season. Older and sicker individuals see their immunity decrease over time lasting as short a period as 3-4 months in some. The shortened immunity in seniors is the reason we usually suggest they receive the vaccine between Halloween and Thanksgiving. If you have any questions please call the office.

Flu Vaccine will be available at most commercial pharmacies as well as our office and at many workplaces. Please let us know if and when you obtain the vaccine elsewhere and tell us which of the vaccines you received.

I am often asked about adverse reactions and side effects of the vaccine. It is a dead virus. It cannot give you influenza. A successful vaccine will produce some redness, warmth and swelling at the injection site. That means that your immune system is working and reacting appropriately to the injected material. If this occurs put some ice on it and take two acetaminophen. Feel free to call us or set up an appointment to be seen that day so we can evaluate the injection site.

A Blood Test for Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Researchers presented a paper at the annual Digestive Disease Week meeting which introduced a commercial blood test which can help distinguish irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) from Cohn’s Disease or Ulcerative Colitis (Inflammatory Bowel Diseases) and Celiac Disease ( Gluten Sensitive Enteropathy). The test was especially effective in identifying the diarrhea predominant form of Irritable bowel syndrome. The issue was discussed today on line in the periodical MedPage Today.

Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome get sudden abdominal bloating, cramping and progressively watery loose bowel movements. The symptoms often occur after a meal and leave the patient frightened and exhausted. Symptoms can be prolonged and emotionally and physically incapacitate an individual. Until now physicians were forced to schedule barium enemas, small bowel x ray series and fiber optic examinations (sigmoidoscopies, colonoscopies, upper endoscopies) to distinguish irritable bowel syndrome from the more ominous inflammatory bowel diseases. Very often we needed to collect stool specimens to look for white blood cells, red blood cells, bacteria, parasites and chemical constituents. The cost, radiation exposure and risks of invasive procedures causing complications made the experience expensive and unpleasant but necessary.

The current blood tests, used in a trial of 2700 patients, detect antibodies to cytolethal distending toxin B and vinculin. Mark Pimental, MD of Cedars-Sinai Medic al Center in Los Angeles said to the tests were successful in distinguishing IBS from the other entities with specificity well above 90% and a positive predictive value of 98.6% allowing clinicians to rule out Crohn’s Disease or Ulcerative Colitis.

This is a step in the right direction but it remains to be seen when the test will be available locally through commercial labs and if it really will allow us to eliminate the many tests we now do to distinguish these problems from one another.

Peppermint Oil for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms

At Digestive Disease Week meetings researchers discussed the success of slow release peppermint oil (IBgard) in reducing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. The study was reviewed in the online journal of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, MedPage Today.

According to Brooks Cash, MD, of the University of South Alabama in Mobile and associates, the number of severe and unbearable symptoms were significantly reduced using their delayed release peppermint oil tablet. Peppermint has been used for generations to reduce intestinal problems. I remember as a first year medical student, diagnosed with “ spastic colon” being prescribed peppermint flavored “ Tincture of Rhubarb and Soda” by the Chief of Gastroenterology at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Taken before meals, it produced a warm soothing feeling on the way down followed by a gentle burp. The tincture was mixed in traditional pharmacies which were all “compounding pharmacies” in those days. It is virtually unobtainable today. Peppermint oil is available over the counter today in the form of gel caps and tablets with an unpredictable delivery system. When the peppermint oil is released early in the stomach it can cause heartburn and dyspepsia. When it is released later it can produce rectal irritation and burning and lower gastrointestinal discomfort.

The new product, IBgard, has a delivery system that allows it to leave the stomach before its product is released in the small intestine where the environment is right for a positive effect. The product is produced by IM HealthScience in Boca Raton, Florida and is expected to be on the shelves in June. Patients are advised to take two tablets 30- 90 minutes before a meal, three times a day. A package of 48 tablets should sell for about $30.

More Anesthesia Needed For Cigarette Smokers

In a landmark study researchers in Turkey looked at the amount of anesthesia needed to sedate and anesthetize active smokers, passive smokers and nonsmokers for a surgical hysterectomy. Passive smokers were nonsmokers who were exposed to second hand smoke and had evidence of cotine in their blood. Cotine is a metabolite of nicotine. There were 30 women in each group.

Standard intravenous anesthesia was used on all patients. After each surgery the amount of anesthesia and post-operative pain killer needed to control pain was assessed. Smokers required 38% more propofol than nonsmokers and 17% more than passive smokers. Smokers used 23% more painkiller than nonsmokers and 6% more than passive smokers to control post-operative pain.

The explanations for why this occurs include the fact that nicotine affects the metabolism of anesthetic drugs in the liver. It may increase the activity of the enzyme systems that metabolize the anesthesia thus requiring higher doses. Anesthesiologists in general have not considered cigarette smoking as a reason to consider using more medicine and higher doses but must now take this into consideration when planning a procedure. What may be interesting is if in future studies researchers are able to measure how far in advance of a procedure smoking cessation is needed to allow the anesthesiologist to use the smaller anesthesia levels appropriate for nonsmokers to achieve the sedation and pain control required to operate?