Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis, Safety and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals

Over the last few years, great emphasis has been placed on preventing blood clots from forming in the legs and pelvis of all hospitalized patients. These blood clots can break off and travel to the lungs causing life-threatening breathing problems and fatal heart arrhythmias and sudden death. Preventing these “venous thromboembolic events” has been a priority of quality organizations like the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals which inspect hospitals and offer certification if the hospital meets their criteria.

The movement to prevent these clots and sudden death has become so strong that you cannot admit a patient to the hospital without addressing these issues. Physicians must either choose to give injections below the skin with the blood thinner heparin three times a day or the low molecular weight heparin twice a day. You are additionally asked to prescribe mechanical compression stockings to the legs to further reduce the risk.

If you choose not to institute these orders you must clearly write out and outline your objections and reasons for not taking these measures. Even if you document your reasons for not instituting these measures you’re assured of receiving a call from your hospital’s quality care organization.

This all becomes newsworthy because two recent studies called into question the practices. One study concluded that mechanical compression stockings added nothing to the use of blood thinners in preventing deep vein clots. The other study cited that for every 1000 patients treated with blood thinners to prevent pulmonary emboli; you prevented three non-fatal pulmonary emboli at the expense of causing nine bleeding events – four of which are major.  I suspect this data will be discussed in our medical journals and at scholarly meetings and a consensus opinion will be reached on how to proceed. Letters will be written to journals criticizing the methods of these studies and other letters will be written defending them and, ultimately, a common sense approach will be reached.

In the meantime, it would be far more interesting to look at the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals and determine how they got so powerful that they can mandate procedures which may not have any value and may do harm?  Who are they?  How do they generate income and how much goes to who and why?

It is a fact that in the state of Florida, private insurers like Blue Cross Blue Shield, Aetna, Humana, will not contract with a hospital or institution unless it receives certification from this organization.  A study should be done to see if these JCAHO inspections costing $7-8 million dollars every other year resulted in any reduction of in-hospital errors, iatrogenic illnesses, death rates and serious illness?

Insurers and employers who pick up the “lion’s share” of our health care costs are always asking for accountability and efficiency and want to pay for what works. It would be nice to know if their relationship with JCAHO has made the patient safer or healthier over the last 15 years.

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